The arrival of spring is a welcome occurrence for many people. Budding flowers are among the harbingers of spring. Spring flowers can revitalize winter-weary people just when they need it most — and provide reassurance that brighter, warmer and longer hours of sunlight are just around the corner. Cold-tolerant flowers are hardy enough to start blooming before the last frosts have dissipated. Other flowers will begin to fill in as days warm a little bit more, according to Better Homes and Gardens. Home gardeners looking to warm up their gardens with early blooms can use these flowers in their early-season containers, window boxes and planting beds.

PANSY
Pansies prefer cool weather, which can make them one of the best flowers to plant in early spring and late fall. Pansies come in a variety of colours, so there’s bound to be an offering that will blend with any homeowners’ landscape design.

DAFFODIL
Daffodil bulbs produce cheerful, yellow flowers in early spring. The traditional daffodil flower may be a showy yellow or white, with six petals and a trumpet-shape central corona, but many cultivated varietiesn exist today.

SNOWDROPS
Snowdrops can peek out even when there is snow still on the ground — sometimes as early as January and February. But, their name is actually a reference to their appearance, as snowdrops have three white petals that hang down like drops dripping off the stem.

VIOLETS
These flowers are closely related to pansies and, as a result, prefer cool seasons. Violets are generally slightly smaller than pansy blooms, but they can be just as beautiful. But, as with pansies, violets will start to fade when the heat arrives.

CREEPING PHLOX
Also known “moss phlox,” creeping phlox is a short ground-cover that is a herbaceous perennial. Phlox produces small, fragrant flowers in dense clusters, which can attract wildlife, such as butterflies, to their mats across the soil surface.

TULIP
From jewel-toned miniatures to the dazzle of huge lush doubles, tulips are available in a vast range of choices for creating stylish beds and borders.

CROCUS
Crocus plants are relatively small, only reaching three to six inches in height. However, their grass-like leaves are some of the first sprouts that can be seen among bulb and corm plantings. Preferring full to partial sun, these gold, purple, lavender, white, or yellow flowers can be enjoyed during the earliest days of spring.

HYACINTH
Hyacinths usually appear after crocus but before tulips. Although hyacinth plants are small, they pack a big punch of both colour and fragrance in their clusters of blooms.